Saturday, December 13, 2014

Canadian Cops Can Now Search Your Phone!!

WHAT CIA TORTURE AND POLICE VIOLENCE HAVE IN COMMON - CRY-BABY OF THE WEEK - THE VICE ALBUMS OF THE YEAR 2014 


 
Canadian Cops Can Now Search Your Phone if You’ve Been Arrested, so Slap a Password on it
Following a Supreme Court ruling, Canadian police can search your phone and computer when they arrest you. Even if you're released without charge or trial.
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Cry-Baby of the Week: A Guy Threw a Snake at a Restaurant Worker in a Dispute Over Onions
Also this week: A guy allegedly killed his ex-girlfriend's pet rabbit because she asked him to move out of their apartment.
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Luka Magnotta Might Not Go to Prison
He committed one of the most gruesome murders in recent Canadian history. That's not in dispute, but his mental state is.
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Don't buy your family members $5 umbrellas and strawberry Nesquik for Christmas this year.
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The VICE Albums of the Year 2014
If you don’t agree, you’re wrong.
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Elizabeth May Ushered a Group of 9/11 Truthers into Canadian Parliament
Bizarrely enough, Elizabeth May felt like it was her duty to bring the Truther message forward to the Canadian government.
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DOs & DON'Ts

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Friday, December 12, 2014

International Human Rights Day

Access celebrates International Human Rights Day... and 11 other stories 


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Access Express | 12/10/14
Today marks the 66th anniversary of the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and Access is celebrating Human Rights Day by bringing you a series of blog posts spotlighting the digital rights challenges of 2015.
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There’s a new arms race taking place online. “Cyber” may soon join air, land, sea, and space as a new theatre of military warfare.
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Staff Picks
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U.S. Senator Ron Wyden introduced the Secure Data Act, a bill that would prohibit the government from creating "backdoors" in hardware and software that can be used by governments and criminals to attack users.
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The debate on how governments use the data of airline passengers rages in Europe after an EU Commissioner surprised legislators with some confusing statements.
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From the Access Community
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The Commission of Ecuador's National Assembly initiated an accelerated process to approve a draft Telecommunications Law with a provision that would give the Ministry of Defense increased powers in situations of “public calamity"--an overbroad authority.
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Global Voices calls attention to the cases of Alaa Abd El Fattah and Bassel Khartabil (aka Bassel Safadi), two jailed bloggers who are serving arbitrary sentences that will jeopardize their futures as innovative and free thinkers from the Arab region.
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Global internet freedom declined for a fourth consecutive year, as new laws criminalized online dissent and legitimized overbroad surveillance and data collection, while more people were arrested for legitimate online activities than ever before.
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Thailand ordered U.S. online taxi booking company Uber to cease operations on Tuesday, in the latest hit for the rideshare app that has been banned in the Indian capital of New Delhi and which faces further restrictions in Europe and Asia.
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The Investigatory Powers Tribunal, an independent judicial body set up to hear public complaints about secret intelligence programs in the UK, has ruled that bulk surveillance programs don’t necessarily violate the human rights of British citizens.
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Microsoft, which is fighting a U.S. warrant requiring it to hand over email from servers based in Ireland, urges the Obama Administration to consider what would happen if foreign governments demanded the same treatment.
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Notorious for its censorship of microblogs, China has stepped up its repression of dissidents with the arrests of writers and editors Xu Xiao, Xu Yue, Liu Jianshu, and He Zhengjun.
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The government's bulk collection of Americans’ call records was brought before a U.S. appeals court for the third time in as many months on Monday. The appeal comes after a lower court ruled that the collection did not violate the Fourth Amendment.
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Comcast customers have sued the company for turning their routers into public Wi-Fi hotspots, saying Comcast’s actions pose risks to subscribers and are taken without seeking their authorization.
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This week's Express was curated by Lee Gensler. Have a tip for a story, or suggestion for an article? Let us know! Contact us at: express@accessnow.org.

To view the Express on the Access site, go here.
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Access defends and extends the digital rights of users at risk around the world. By combining tech-driven policy, user engagement, and direct technical support, we fight for open and secure communications for all. To help protect the internet around the world, you can donate to Access. To reply, please email Access@accessnow.org.