Thursday, October 16, 2014

Mass internet surveillance threatens international law.

RightsCon is back with a brand new edition... and 13 other stories 

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Access Express | 10/16/14
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Nearly half of the world’s internet users live in Southeast Asia. They're encountering an internet that encourages not only innovation, but also attacks on basic rights. That’s why we’re working with EngageMedia to hold RightsCon in Manila in March 2015.
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Staff Picks
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Mass surveillance of the internet by intelligence agencies is “corrosive of online privacy” and threatens to undermine international law, according to a report to the United Nations general assembly.
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President Barack Obama said this week he is still “unequivocally committed to net neutrality” and that he wants the Federal Communications Commission to issue rules that prevent Internet service providers from creating paid fast lanes.
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From the Access Community
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In July, the UK Parliament ordered an open review of its surveillance legislation. Access took this opportunity to add our own critiques and suggest reforms to increase transparency and overcome Parliament’s support for data retention laws.
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The National Security Agency has had agents in China, Germany, and South Korea working on programs that use “physical subversion” to infiltrate and compromise networks and devices, according to documents obtained by The Intercept.
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Colombia's Minister of Information and Communication Technologies is pushing a dangerous program to give each citizen a “digital portfolio,” where personal data like passport numbers and tax information would be stored.
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Snapchat could be in hot water with regulators after private images and videos from as many as 200,000 users were posted online. The service has denied it was hacked, blaming the release on outside companies that users rely on to store their photos.
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A Japanese court has ordered Google to remove links to one man's embarrassing past, a ruling that shows the “right to be forgotten” movement is spreading to Asia.
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A cyberespionage campaign believed to be based in Russia has been targeting government leaders and institutions for nearly five years, according to researchers with iSight Partners who have examined code used in the attacks.
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Civil liberties group Privacy International has filed a criminal complaint against British spyware maker Gamma International, alleging Gamma was criminally complicit in helping the Bahrain government spy on pro-democracy activists.
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A counterterrorism bill before the French Parliament would allow the government to bar anyone who authorities suspect would participate in terrorist activities from leaving France, and would block websites that “incite” or “glorify” terrorism.
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The Iranian authorities keep a close watch on electronic messages. When jokes about former Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khomeini began circulating in Iran via WhatsApp, Tango and Viber, twelve people were arrested.
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Until the fall of the Berlin wall, the East German state security service surveilled and kept files on a third of the country’s population. Now, keeping phone, internet and location metadata will allow Stasi files to be created for all Australians.
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The EU’s “right to be forgotten” has left many advocates in the Middle East fearful that similar laws may allow governments in the region to further curtail freedom of information and expression on the internet.
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  This week's Express was curated by Lee Gensler. Have a tip for a story, or suggestion for an article? Let us know! Contact us at: express@accessnow.org.

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Access defends and extends the digital rights of users at risk around the world. By combining tech-driven policy, user engagement, and direct technical support, we fight for open and secure communications for all. To help protect the internet around the world, you can donate to Access. To reply, please email Access@accessnow.org