Thursday, October 30, 2014

Australia's terror laws set to erode human rights...China has ramped up instant messaging censorship...Facebook tells police they must obey the site's rules

Australia's terror laws set to erode human rights... and 14 other stories 

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Access Express | 10/30/14
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The sweeping new powers contained in Australia's terror laws violate privacy and expression rights and create a mutually reinforcing surveillance scheme, greatly restricting the spaces in which people are free to think and act.
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Staff Picks
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Access has written up an overview of the top procedural and substantive concerns to look out for at ITU Plenipotentiary. We've also included recommendations for relevant and productive areas for the ITU to focus on over the next four years.
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Verizon Wireless has been subtly altering the web traffic of its wireless customers for the past two years, inserting an ID number into data flowing between customers and the websites they visit.
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From the Access Community
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Hungary's government wants to tax internet data, and thousands of citizens responded by swarming the streets of the capital. Around 10,000 people turned up to protest the proposal to tax ISPs abound $0.60 per gigabyte of traffic served to users.
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Obama’s recent Executive Order is a first step towards protecting user security, but as National Cybersecurity Awareness month winds down, Obama should instruct administration officials to respect and support the increased use of encryption.
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Does an employer have the right to look at employees’ emails? This is not a rhetorical question, but rather a situation that is likely to become a reality in Peru if the Congress approves a ruling by the Commission on Labor and Social Security.
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Verizon is bankrolling a tech site called SugarString. It looks kind of like a regular news site at first glance, but you won't find any stories about spying or net neutrality, two broad policy topics in which Verizon has been controversially involved.
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Ello’s recent move to become a public benefit corporation, which commits the budding site to remaining ad-free and not selling user data, says less about the website and more about its more dominant competitor Facebook and users’ growing privacy concerns.
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In 2007, the FBI wrote a fake news story about bomb threats and sent out email links in the style of the Seattle Times to secretly install spyware on the computer of a suspect. The details have now been published by that very same newspaper.
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Facebook scolded the Drug Enforcement Administration this week after learning an agent had impersonated a user in order to gather intelligence on suspects, warning the agency that the practice explicitly violated the site’s terms of service.
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Ten days ago, web documentary “Helicoca – The 60 Million Reais Helicopter” was removed from YouTube thanks to a copyright claim. Local netizens have begun to suspect that the video's removal was set in motion by presidential candidate AĆ©cio Neves.
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Hackers have recently breached the White House’s unclassified computer network. The White House says it has taken steps to address suspicious activity detected on its network, but no details were released on who may have been responsible.
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Italy lags behind most of its neighbors in internet access and usage, but when it comes to drafting of an Internet Bill of Rights, Italy stands among the leaders after opening a draft bill for consultation via the Civici platform this week.
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Britain's intelligence services do not need a warrant to receive unlimited bulk intelligence from the NSA and other foreign agencies, and can keep this data on a massive searchable database for up to two years, according to secret internal policies.
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The instant messaging app LINE has strengthened its censorship methods in mainland China. The app now censors more topics than ever before and is censoring in a way that is harder to detect for the average user.
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  This week's Express was curated by Lee Gensler. Have a tip for a story, or suggestion for an article? Let us know! Contact us at: express@accessnow.org.

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