Thursday, September 11, 2014

Net Neutrality on the move around the world

Net Neutrality on the move around the world... and 13 other stories 


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Access Express | 09/11/14
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We are in the thick of a worldwide fight to protect net neutrality. This week, the fight takes focus in the U.S., were the FCC proposed rules that would open the door to widespread discrimination online, allowing telcos to create a two-tiered internet.
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Access launched www.mlat.info, a website that makes it easy to explore the text and geographical scope of Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties, which dictate how users’ data is shared with foreign governments for criminal investigations and prosecutions.
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Access, with a coalition of 10 digital rights groups, submitted a letter to the Google Advisory Council to set the record straight about the so-called “right to be forgotten” and to address misrepresentations of a recent European Court of Justice ruling.
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From the Access Community
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From Mexico to Mozambique to Pakistan and beyond, there is now ample evidence that governments across the globe are using mass surveillance technologies such as FinFisher to spy on their citizens, and Germany is a major exporter of these technologies.
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Most mobile app developers are failing to clearly explain how they are collecting, using and disclosing personal information, according to a study by the pan-governmental Global Privacy Enforcement Network.
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The newly released 2014 Global Information Society Watch (GISWatch) report covers the state of digital surveillance around the globe using the International Principles on the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance.
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The FCC has received 1.47 million comments on its plan for new net neutrality rules. The previous record of 1.4 million was broken Wednesday amid an internet-wide protest of the FCC’s plan, which critics warn would lead to a two-tiered internet.
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Lebanon's Minister of Telecommunications has ordered ISPs to block six pornographic websites, according to a leaked communiqué. There is little precedent for this type of filtering in Lebanon, apart from the blocking of a local gambling site last January.
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ESD, a defense and law enforcement technology firm that makes one of the oldest high-security cell phones reports they have been noticing fake cell towers across the U.S. Who is running the interceptors and what they are doing with the calls is unclear.
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Swiss authorities are investigating the potentially illegal export of mobile phone surveillance technology to an infamous elite unit of the Bangladeshi security apparatus accused of wide-scale human rights abuses.
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U.S. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper claimed the U.S. does not steal trade secrets of foreign companies on behalf of or give intelligence to U.S. companies. But a secret 2009 report issued by Clapper’s office contemplates doing just that.
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This month, at the 27th session of the Human Rights Council, internet rights and freedoms will feature prominently with the highlight being the Council’s consideration of a report on the Right to Privacy in the Digital Age.
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As the trial of alleged Silk Road creator approaches, his defense has focused on how the government discovered the Silk Road’s server in Iceland, in spite of the site using Tor, arguing the discovery may have represented a search without a warrant.
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The U.S. government is paying private contractors billions of dollars to support secretive military units with drones, surveillance technology, and “psychological operations,” according to new research.
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  This week's Express was curated by Lee Gensler. Have a tip for a story, or suggestion for an article? Let us know! Contact us at: express@accessnow.org.

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